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Every year, our country celebrates Labor Day on the first Monday of September. Probably more than any other holiday, the meaning of Labor Day gets lost. And, unless you work a government job, you probably don’t even get the day off. I suspect most Americans just think of Labor Day as a celeb…

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I woke up Saturday, turned the television on, and cried. While I get misty-eyed from time to time, tears rarely flow. The last time it happened was probably the death of a loved one. But there I was watching Good Morning America when an emotional gut-punch opened the spigot of my tears.

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An item I found at an estate sale a couple of weeks ago and the corresponding opening of local schools for the fall session reminded me of so many years ago, about 65 of them, when I was in elementary school.

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Is it just me or does anyone else feel like they’re trapped in some unending Twilight Zone episode, or caught in a nightmare and not able to wake up?

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When I was a child back in the early 1950s, a patent medicine called Hadacol was the rage of the United States, especially in the South. People claimed it could cure a variety of ills and gulped it down by the gallons before the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) pulled the plug.

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A friend sent me a copy of a new book, “Wilmington’s Lie” by Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Zucchino. The story of racial injustice at the turn of the 20th century took me back to Wilmington, North Carolina in 1898.

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The adventure called life yields uncertainty. Normal times are increasingly hard to remember but traditions remain. Despite rocky school closures last Spring, some things never change, like rituals for college students.

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Sometimes I feel like the United States was overcome by a virus long before COVID-19 hit. That virus was the “stupid virus.” In the trying days of this runaway pandemic, there are still people out there who insist it’s a hoax and are ready to believe crazy conspiracy theories instead of medi…

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I enjoy holding a newspaper in my hand. Turning the pages to find a favorite column or to check the latest in sports invites me to relax and read news over a cup of tea. Sure, I can do that on a device, but gadgets invite a different, more hurried, interaction.

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In the mid-1960s, the federal government ordered United States automobile manufacturers to install seatbelts in all new cars. In the years that followed, every state in the country, except New Hampshire, passed laws requiring passengers to wear seatbelts.

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COVID-19 has hit the nation hard. This once-in-a-generation public health crisis knows no bounds — affecting just about everyone in some way.