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Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home law…

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Q: I want to add a pergola to my small backyard garden and I want a vine to grow on it. What would you suggest?

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In Oglethorpe County, 4-H’ers have met monthly for the past seven years as a part of the Georgia 4-H Cooking to Share initiative, which challenges 4-H’ers across the state to develop cooking skills by preparing food for families in need.

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A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.

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Q. I would like to start composting, but I don’t know where to begin. Will I need a compost bin? Can I use my raked leaves to make compost?

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During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible l…

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The University of Georgia, The Ohio State University and Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural University, a private university in Honduras, partnered to facilitate 4-H programming during the COVID-19 pandemic at six Honduran schools, reaching 180 students.

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Economists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) will discuss the effects of COVID-19 on farming, highlight agritourism impacts in the state, and give a forecast of top commodities for the next year during the annual Georgia Ag Forecast.

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Both veteran and novice gardeners have spent many hours taking care of plants and gardens while spending extra time at home this year.

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Q: I was gifted with a Christmas cactus. Now what do I do to care for it properly?

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Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit…

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By 2050, the animal and food industry will need to be able to feed a world with a projected population increase of 2.1 billion. With the help of industry and academic experts, University of Georgia researchers identified the most pressing issues for the animal and food industry to address a …

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It truly has been an amazing year for all of us, hasn’t it? A whole lot of things good and bad landed on our plates as we have all learned (or are learning) to adjust to “the new normal”.

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The unlikely combination of a generous grant from a local benefactor and the impact of a stubborn pandemic together have produced a silver lining outcome — the installation of a bird garden at Carrollton Elementary School with the help and expertise of Georgia Audubon and an ecological lands…

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Q. I have tried to find duplicates of several shrubs that I planted years ago including viburnum, Rose of Sharon, and hydrangea. I have looked at commercial nurseries but cannot find what I am looking for. Any suggestions? Julie C.

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The international popularity of pecans is trending upward, but more reliable measures for guaranteeing quality during storage are needed to meet demand in Georgia, the top state for pecan production.

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As residents across the state deal with periods of flood-level rainfall, University of Georgia researchers have announced a partnership that will enable them to share flood risk data with other scientists across the U.S.

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Many residents have noticed mushrooms popping up in lawns and landscapes this season. When the “fungus among us” forms a circle or arc pattern, it’s commonly known as a fairy ring.

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Q. This year I became a first- time homeowner. Having enjoyed watching the backyard birds, I would like some ideas for attracting more birds. Can you help with ideas for planting the appropriate varieties of flowers, shrubs, and trees for my garden? Allison F.

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To prune or not to prune, that is the question. Pruning is an important part of maintaining plant health and maximizing plant productivity. This is often a topic that brings fear and confusion, but pruning is, in fact, a beneficial and routine task.

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved new five-year registrations for two dicamba products and extended the registration of an additional dicamba product for use on dicamba-tolerant cotton and soybeans in a decision estimated to save growers and producers of the product…

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At the October meeting of Rebecca Martin Home and Garden Club, members were introduced to the “Get Healthy, Live Well” program by Phyllis Head of Tanner Health System. Head provided information regarding various programs open to the public and sponsored by Tanner. Members enjoyed a short cla…

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Q: I am hoping to expand my garden by adding some carnivorous plants. Can you give me some information?

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Antibiotic resistance — one of the biggest threats to global health, according to the World Health Organization — occurs when germs learn how to defeat the drugs designed to kill them. The problem of resistance threatens the efficacy of antibiotics, making simple infections untreatable.

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Q: I am relatively new to gardening and when I heard the term, “putting the garden to bed,” I was unsure just what that meant. Can you give me a little insight as to what that term is referring to?

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With all of the rain that we’ve experienced this year, many fungal leaf spot diseases are active. Hydrangeas are particularly susceptible to several different leaf spot diseases that favor moist weather.

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Q. After successfully having my first decent vegetable garden this year, I’m wondering if there are perennial vegetables that I could add next year.

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A new multistate project will bring together researchers from the University of Georgia and partner universities to fight Alternaria leaf blight and head rot in broccoli, a plant disease that thrives in warm temperatures and humidity.

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Georgia 4-H empowers youth become self-directing, productive and contributing members of society by establishing personal and sincere relationships, learning life and leadership skills and enhancing community awareness.

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As the 2020 gardening season winds down and cooler temperatures move in, we begin to reflect and assess how our gardens performed during the summer growing season.

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While weeds and plant parasites are a concern for all agricultural producers, organic producers are doubly challenged to combat these problems without chemical solutions. Through a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a University of Georgia researcher is working to discover and in…

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A new scholarship program funded by University of Georgia alumni and benefitting qualified students from rural areas of Georgia who seek to earn degrees from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) is now recruiting students for its first cohort to begin in fall 2021.

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Q. Which flowering shrubs should I prune now in the fall? I have some that bloom in spring, and some bloom in summer. A few have grown too big for their space, but I’d rather not dig them up. Can I prune them back even more?

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As the weather cools across the state, several fall insects will begin to take center stage around Georgia homes. Be on the lookout for these nuisance pests and make preparations to deter them from entering your home for the winter.

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With the fall migration underway for monarch butterflies through November, gardeners should soon start seeing the colorful creatures on their travels south. It’s also time to be on the lookout for pests of common milkweed (Ascelpias tuberosa), the most popular milkweed plant grown in Georgia…

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Q: I have several paths on my property and they are covered in this weed. How do I get rid of it?

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A $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will allow researchers at the University of Georgia to examine the minutiae of cattle and fescue microbiome interaction to find targets that will help mitigate the effects of fescue toxicosis, a forage-related condition that costs the …

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When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens — as well as lowering labor costs — by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields.

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Q: I just read an article online about something called the “Insect Apocalypse.” Is this real?

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Q: I would love to garden and have flowers around my house, but I have such a small yard. What can I do in such a small area? Mike B.

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Gold may be rare in the north Georgia mountains, but now the region boasts a seed bank that might be worth just as much to Appalachian natives and local gardening enthusiasts.

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Following the onset of several major outbreaks of foodborne pathogens traced back to wildlife, buyers of farm-fresh produce began encouraging the removal of natural habitats and nesting areas on farms to discourage wildlife intrusion.