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This time of year is the best time for all who call themselves gardeners. March, April and May are the busy months getting plants in the ground. Then, June, July and August are the months to enjoy the fruits of our labor.

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Q. My family loves strawberries. We plant a garden every year, and this year I would like to put few strawberry plants in our garden. I need to know the best variety to plant for our area, and tips on growing strawberries. Thanks. D. Grant.

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Several people I know love to feed birds and put out bushes and trees to entice wild birds to stop in their yard for a little break. However, as a responsible gardener, one should research the plants being established in their gardens.

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In the southeast, a cloud of yellow pollen is an inevitability at the start of every year. Along with it comes an onslaught of allergies that have most people popping their Zyrtecs or Claritins several times a day, every day, for months on end. But are these two events connected?

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Q: We’ve been reading and seeing a lot about the upcoming cicada emergence later this spring. Is there any good information about what to expect?

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Q. What can you tell me about the cacti that I see growing in yards around Atlanta? I thought cacti were southwestern desert plants.

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Q: I planted jonquil bulbs that I dug from a friend’s yard. I transplanted them in our woods that are speckled with sunlight through deciduous trees. Every year all of them produce nice green stems, but not one has ever bloomed. Do you by chance know what could be going on?

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While searching the Internet for seed starting equipment, several articles and videos surfaced on a seed starting method called winter sowing. Curiosity getting the best of me, I forgot all about the seed starting equipment I was looking for and started reading the articles and watching vide…

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Now that spring is approaching, garden enthusiasts are excited to get their gardens in progress. There are a few tips and tricks to discuss.

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On a sunny tree trunk, that green growth is not moss, it is a composite called lichen (pronounced “liken”). No, it is not parasitic, and it is not hurting your tree.

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Q: Without frightening everyone to pieces, what kind of insect activity should we be on the lookout for in early spring?

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Q: I am interested in planting a mixed garden with blooming shrubs and flowers. I would like to include old fashioned favorites like those from grandmother’s garden. I would like to know more about a plant that grandmother called Deutzia.

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Q. I was watching a television show that featured Preppers, those who prepare for a doomsday event or just want to be self-sustaining. One of those interviewed mentioned that her group was going to start an aquaponics farm, but the show never explained. What is aquaponics?

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I wrote about muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifoli) four or five years ago, but I thought it was relevant to bring them up again. Georgia Senate Bill 358 was signed by the Gov. Kemp on Aug. 5, 2020 designated the muscadine grape as the official state grape.

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Q. I saw a magical looking iridescent begonia at Lowe’s a while back, but I was too intimidated to buy it. Now I wish I had. Are the iridescent ones hard to care for?

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Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home law…

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Q: I want to add a pergola to my small backyard garden and I want a vine to grow on it. What would you suggest?

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In Oglethorpe County, 4-H’ers have met monthly for the past seven years as a part of the Georgia 4-H Cooking to Share initiative, which challenges 4-H’ers across the state to develop cooking skills by preparing food for families in need.

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A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.

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Q. I would like to start composting, but I don’t know where to begin. Will I need a compost bin? Can I use my raked leaves to make compost?

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During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible l…

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The University of Georgia, The Ohio State University and Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural University, a private university in Honduras, partnered to facilitate 4-H programming during the COVID-19 pandemic at six Honduran schools, reaching 180 students.

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Economists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) will discuss the effects of COVID-19 on farming, highlight agritourism impacts in the state, and give a forecast of top commodities for the next year during the annual Georgia Ag Forecast.

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Both veteran and novice gardeners have spent many hours taking care of plants and gardens while spending extra time at home this year.

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Q: I was gifted with a Christmas cactus. Now what do I do to care for it properly?

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Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit…

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By 2050, the animal and food industry will need to be able to feed a world with a projected population increase of 2.1 billion. With the help of industry and academic experts, University of Georgia researchers identified the most pressing issues for the animal and food industry to address a …

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It truly has been an amazing year for all of us, hasn’t it? A whole lot of things good and bad landed on our plates as we have all learned (or are learning) to adjust to “the new normal”.

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The unlikely combination of a generous grant from a local benefactor and the impact of a stubborn pandemic together have produced a silver lining outcome — the installation of a bird garden at Carrollton Elementary School with the help and expertise of Georgia Audubon and an ecological lands…

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Q. I have tried to find duplicates of several shrubs that I planted years ago including viburnum, Rose of Sharon, and hydrangea. I have looked at commercial nurseries but cannot find what I am looking for. Any suggestions? Julie C.

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The international popularity of pecans is trending upward, but more reliable measures for guaranteeing quality during storage are needed to meet demand in Georgia, the top state for pecan production.

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As residents across the state deal with periods of flood-level rainfall, University of Georgia researchers have announced a partnership that will enable them to share flood risk data with other scientists across the U.S.

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Many residents have noticed mushrooms popping up in lawns and landscapes this season. When the “fungus among us” forms a circle or arc pattern, it’s commonly known as a fairy ring.

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Q. This year I became a first- time homeowner. Having enjoyed watching the backyard birds, I would like some ideas for attracting more birds. Can you help with ideas for planting the appropriate varieties of flowers, shrubs, and trees for my garden? Allison F.

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To prune or not to prune, that is the question. Pruning is an important part of maintaining plant health and maximizing plant productivity. This is often a topic that brings fear and confusion, but pruning is, in fact, a beneficial and routine task.